Displaying the Print Dialog Box in a Macro

Before printing anything in Excel, it is not unusual to display the Print dialog box. This allows you to make changes to how the print job will be handled by the printer driver.

If you are creating a macro that is used to print information from your worksheets, you may want to display the Print dialog box programmatically. The user can then choose to print, directly from within your macro.

To add this capability, simply include the following macro line:

bTemp = Application.Dialogs(xlDialogPrint).Show

The Show method results in the Print dialog box being displayed. When this code line is finished, bTemp will be either True or False. If True, it means that the user clicked on OK in the dialog box, thereby printing something. If False, then the user either clicked on Cancel or the Close button to close the dialog box without printing.

You might wonder if this approach will work in Excel 2013 seeing as the program now uses what Redmond refers to as “Backstage view” to intiate printing. (Just press Ctrl+P and you can see the printing options in Backstage view.) Fortunately, it does. Excel 2013 dutifully displays the Print dialog box as it appeared in earlier versions of the program, bypassing completely the need for what you see in Backstage view.